Article Abstract

Yield of endoscopy of the lower digestive tract in relation to ethnic descent

Authors: Ruud J. L. F. Loffeld, Boris Liberov, Pascale E. P. Dekkers

Abstract

Background: Not much is known of the yield of endoscopy in relation to ethnic descent. The aim is to study endoscopy of the lower digestive tract in relation to the ethnicity.
Methods: A prospectively collected dataset was used. Presence four endoscopic findings (diverticuli, polyps, colorectal cancer, and signs of inflammation) was studied. The patients were divided in four groups. Group 1 patients of Western descent, group 2 patients of Turkish descent, group 3 patients originating from Morocco, Northern Africa and the Middle East, and, group 4 patients of Asian descent.
Results: In group 1, 35,340 procedures were done in 24,223 patients, in group 2 this was 1,776 in 1,338 patients respectively. In groups 3 and 4 this was 465 in 371 patients, and 416 in 305 patients. There was no difference in gender between the four groups, the number of women undergoing endoscopy was higher in all groups. Overall abnormalities in colon and rectum were significantly more often seen in group 1. Colorectal cancer was significantly less often diagnosed in patients of groups 3 and 4. Polyp(s) were significantly less often seen in patients of groups 2 and 3. While diverticulosis of the colon was significantly more often diagnosed in patients of group 1. Signs of inflammation in colon and/or rectum were significantly more often seen in patients of groups 2, 3, and 4.
Conclusions: There are clear differences in presence of colorectal abnormalities in patients from different ethnic descent. The implication of this finding in daily practice is not obvious.